A deeper look at familiar Bible passages

What a tangled web we weave when we try to deceive God

What a tangled web we weave when we try to deceive God – Part 1

What a tangled web we weave when we’re double-hearted.  It happens a lot.  We want one thing.  We know we should want another thing.  It’s like those old commercials where there’s an angel on someone’s shoulder.  And a devil on the other shoulder.  Both tell us what to do.  We’d like to get the angel to tell us that what the devil said is OK.

And in the commercial – that can happen.  Like with chocolate milk.  Unfortunately, in real life – as in a good versus evil scenario – that’s just not going to happen.  Why not?  Because those aren’t the real life choices.

new plant - The psychology of the Parable of the Sower

The psychology of the Parable of the Sower

If we think about the Parable of the Sower, the Great Commission and the Greatest Commandment – all together, something should occur to us.  To the extent that we practice the Great Commission and the Greatest Commandment, the people represented by the seeds in the path, the rocky places and the thorns have  a better chance to not staying in those places.

Of course, what happens to anyone’s faith is between them and God.  However, it’s hard to believe that Christians who lovingly care for others won’t increase the likelihood of those at risk of falling away might return to God.  That seems to be a basic part of what Jesus tells us to do in both of the “G C’s” – Greatest Commandment and Great Commission.

We all need love.  God’s kind of love.  And we should all be showing God’s kind of love to others as well.

Revelation - The psychology of the seven letters to the seven churches

Revelation – The psychology of the seven letters to the seven churches

The psychology of the seven letters to the seven churches in Revelation?  Is there really something like that?  Why not?  They are letters from Jesus to the churches.  To us.  Who knows how our minds work better than our Creator?  And who better to point out the things that might stand in the way of our salvation than Jesus?

Dictionary.com defines psychology as: the science of the mind or of mental states and processes.  I know there’s a tendency with some Christians to avoid science, but let’s get real for a second.  God invented science!  So what is there to be afraid of?  Nothing.  So let’s proceed with no fear of science or psychology.

Greater love has no one ...

Greater love has no one …

Greater love has no one …   Most of you recognize those words.  And know how they end.  Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.  But what do they really mean?  Do these words tell us that the greatest love we can show for another person is to die for them?  Literally, physically, die?

On it’s face, it seems rather extreme.  While not discounting times when literally, physically dying does, in fact, show great love, I can’t help but wonder if that’s the only thing Jesus meant when He said that.  Given the context within which Jesus made that one extracted sentence, I feel it means more.  Given the overall context of a Christian who truly works at following Jesus’ teachings, I believe it means a whole lot more.

It matters what that line means.  We’ll explore why as we go along.

A light on a hill? Or a noisy gong?

A light on a hill? Or a noisy gong?

Here’s a question for Christians.  Are you a light on a hill? Or a noisy gong?  Or are you just wondering why I’m asking?  It is a legitimate question.   We’re supposed to be “making disciples”.  But how?  Are we supposed to beat people over the head until they finally give in?  I know that’s been done.  Is still being done.  But is it what Jesus asked for?

The same can be asked of any “in your face” approach to making people become Christians.  The thing about “making disciples” is that Jesus said a whole lot more than just “go do it!”.  He taught us how.  He was a living example of how to do it.  But do we pay attention to that part?

Jesus and the Samaritan Woman - a different view

Jesus and the Samaritan Woman – a different view

Jesus and the Samaritan Woman.  It’s part of John’s gospel that is often talked about. However, here’s a different view of it.  Sure, it’s important to show that the “living water” that Jesus offered was for everyone.  What if we look at it from the point of view of the Great Commission?  Not just as we’re to spread the word to all nations.  But as an example or template of how to go about spreading the gospel?

Notice the word on the chalkboard.  “Feedback”.  It seems like when we spread the gospel, we tend to want to talk.  Just keep saying the nice “churchy” words, and people will get the message.  They’ll say the so-called sinners prayer – which doesn’t exist – and be saved.  Not.

Scroll to Top

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close

I